With the state primaries coming to an end, everyone is asking themselves the same question: Can Trump win the necessary 1,237 delegate votes to clinch the Republican nomination? If you ask anyone from the Kasich camp (yes he's still attempting to be in the running) or the Cruz bandwagon, you're sure to get varying answers.

The truth of the matter is, there is a pathway that Donald Trump can walk where he obtains the 1,237 votes necessary to clinch the nomination once and for all. But it's not a wide, or easy path.

Sure, Trump has shown that he can take states with a huge majority. Look at New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada for instance. But the business mogul has also shown that he's unpopular among a lot of the traditional GOP demographic.

It's that demographic, ironically enough, that Trump wants to skip the polls in order for him to succeed in his quest for the White House.

Trump polls best among less-educated, white voters, the numbers are clear. In order for him to have a strong showing in the remaining primaries--and in the general election--Trump needs to have more of the less-educated show up and fewer of the established GOP voters, the educated whites, come out to vote.

Is that impossible?

No, actually.

And if circumstances pit Trump against Hillary Clinton, the situation becomes even more interesting.

Hillary, as we all know, is far and away disliked. One pundit even compared Trump and Hillary by saying that Trump's flaws are all on the outside: his brashness, his antagonizing talk, while Hillary's flaws are internal: her character.

Hillary is in the negative approval or favorability numbers with white voters and with male voters. That's a lot of the America vote. If Trump can somehow either win the delegates he needs outright in the state primaries, or convince enough to jump ship in the Republican convention, Hillary will likely lose. And that is a good thing, even if Trump is the path to get us there.

h/t: Washington Examiner

 

 

 

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