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The Democrat party continues to struggle to hold on to the minority vote, fearing the possibility that the once-certain bloc might find more hope for change in the message and promise of a Donald Trump presidency.

Democrats support the decades-long narrative that blacks are subjected to racism at every level in society, backing Black Lives Matter and holding firm against entitlement reforms and school choice.

And in the first presidential debate, Hillary Clinton – in a shocking admission of her true beliefs, told the nation that each of us is a racist.

“I think implicit bias is a problem for everyone, not just police. I think unfortunately too many of us in our great country jump to conclusions about each other and therefore I think we need all of us to be asked the hard questions ‘why am I feeling this way?’”

Her opponent, Trump, has gone into black neighborhoods and churches to talk directly with those in poor neighborhoods who deal with failing schools, rising crime and no job prospects on a daily basis.

But when his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence dared tell the truth, black Americans are living in hell,” not only did he come under criticism from Hillary’s VP pick, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, but FOX News correspondent and longtime journalist, Geraldo Rivera.

In the cable channel’s post-vice presidential debate coverage, Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke said he objected to Kaine’s criticism, pointing out that he himself – an African-American – had said the same thing.

"I said the American ghetto is a hellhole — unless Mrs. Bill Clinton and Sen. Kaine think it's OK for blacks to live in entrenched poverty with failing schools, inadequate housing and crime-infested neighborhoods."

Rivera, who was born and raised in New York City, where he still lives, said Clarke was “unfair” in making generalizations about black neighborhoods.

Clarke responded by claiming Clinton and Kaine – and Rivera – apparently “think it’s OK for a growing number of people to live in these hellholes called the American ghetto. It's not OK.”

Rivera took exception, saying, “Harlem is not a hellhole. I got news for you. There are beautiful brownstones there. There’s a striving middle class.”

Clarke ended the discussion by inviting Rivera to ride along with him on patrol for a week in Milwaukee and Chicago.

“I’ll show you a different part of the American ghetto… that’s the part we don’t want to talk about. You want to talk about the areas that have been revitalized.”

Rivera didn’t accept… but he didn’t turn down the invitation, either.

 

 

 

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