At 2:08 am Eastern time, two hours past midnight, and long after the cable news channels froze at 254 to 209, what was left of the crowd of Hillary Clinton supporters were sent home to bed – not by the candidate they had supported, not by her husband – a former president, not her daughter. Not even her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, came to speak to them.

Instead, the symbol of almost all that was wrong and misguided, cynical and corrupt in the inner circle of the Clintons for the past decades briefly took the stage and sent them away dispirited, stunned and hurting.

The Jumbotron behind the stage was shut down, and the silent supporters, some in tears, shuffled out of the Javits Center, the symbolic glass building in Manhattan that had been chosen to underscore what Clinton assumed would be her triumphant moment as she became the first woman to be elected president of the United States.

Instead, John Podesta, the star of Julian Assange’s Wikileaks releases and possibly the most uncharismatic political insider imaginable, was sent to do what Hillary Clinton couldn’t do.

Just as she couldn’t be open and genuine, authentic and “real,” in the various roles she has occupied – not served – during 30 years in the public life, neither could she take the brave step of sharing the pain of loss with those who had stood behind her.

Weeks ago, at the third and final debate between the candidates, FOX host Chris Wallace asked Trump if he would honor the results of the election.

Much was made of his response that he would, “wait and see.”

Interestingly, Wallace did not ask the same question of Clinton, who later told reporters on her plane that Trump’s comment was “outrageous,” adding in what proved to be words that she never thought she would have to follow herself, “We accept the outcomes of our elections, somebody wins and somebody loses.”

Yes, Mrs. Clinton, that’s what we do in America.

That’s what you need to do now, too.

 

 

 

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