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As a candidate, Donald Trump ignited both the passion of his supporters and the fury of his detractors when he promised to build a wall to secure the southern border of the United States – even going so far as to promise that Mexico would pay for the construction of a wall.

“Build the Wall” became a familiar chant at Trump rallies and a touchstone for his campaign as Democrats labeled him a racist and xenophobe who hated Mexicans.

But in fact, the wall was not Trump’s idea at all.

A federal law has been in place for ten years authorizing “the building of 700 miles of physical barriers along the Mexico-United States border.”

The Secure Fence Act passed the Senate 80 to 19 and the House of Representatives by 283 to 138.

President George W. Bush signed the act into law a decade ago, on October 25, 2006, and it has been in place ever since – with $1.2 billion appropriated for its construction in a separate homeland security spending bill.

It has never been challenged – and has never been implemented.

Now, in the early days of the Trump transition, critics predict the wall will never become a reality, but Texas Congressman Louie Gohmert of the border state of Texas is optimistic, pointing out that the funds were already appropriated for the construction.

“It’s amazing what you can get Congress to do when you lead and push them in the right direction… it’s going to be great to have somebody that’s actually following the law.”

The language of the Act states as its goal, “to help secure America’s borders to decrease illegal entry, drug trafficking, and security threats” – concerns that have only become more serious in the past decade as the law has been ignored.

The Secure Fence Act also authorizes the Department of Homeland Security to use cameras, satellites and the relatively new drone technology to support the infrastructure of the wall, as well building more vehicle barriers, checkpoints and lighting.

Protests and anti-Trump marches have erupted into scenes of violence and rioting in cities and some campuses across America as disappointed Clinton supporters took to the streets to rage against… the legitimate election of an American president.

Neither the Clinton campaign nor the Democrat party have made an allegation of voter fraud or even suggested a recount, but many of her supporters are finding it difficult to accept the results of the election.

But it isn’t the rioting that is going viral, but a seven-second video clip of students at a middle school in the Detroit suburb of Royal Oak chanting, “Build the Wall” in the cafeteria.

What appears to be a small group of students briefly repeats the phrase – which was a staple at Trump rallies during the campaign referring to the candidate’s promise to secure the southern border – only five times before it dies out without any reaction by the other students.

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