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When Hillary Clinton and her surrogates tell the media that the American people are tired of hearing about her email scandal, it’s not merely wishful thinking.

It may be true, but not for the reason they want to believe.

Many Americans are frustrated as the drip-by-drip revelations about the Democrat candidate’s secret set-up of an unauthorized email server to conduct the nation’s diplomatic business during her tenure as Secretary of State come out.

A report by the Inspector General and a separate year-long probe by the FBI have resulted in “findings,” but what has left American voters almost numb to the story is the belief that Clinton has been seen to have been guilty, but will not held accountable and punished, but – if she wins in November – rewarded for security breaches that would subject others to criminal charges.

First Hillary said she used only one device, then she said there were no classified documents, then she said she turned over the server voluntarily. When those were found to be untrue, she tried to blame her predecessor, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who pushed back in no uncertain terms.

But voters aren’t necessarily as powerless as they believe.

South Carolina Congressman Trey Gowdy, a former federal prosecutor who has leveled tough questions at FBI Director James Comey during two hearings before the House Oversight Committee after Comey presented a damning 14-minute list of Clinton’s violations of federal law before declining to recommend prosecution, says Americans do have power.

Gowdy, who asked Comey point-blank, “What would she have had to do to warrant your recommendation for prosecution?” says there is a way Americans can “vigorously disagree” with the decision not to prosecute Clinton or any members of her staff – at the ballot booth.


Americans have the ability to vote in a new Department of Justice on November 8th.

And that’s far from powerless.



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