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A statue was carted away amid nearly 100 activist and protesters, some of who carried signs that read slogans like "No slave owner is a hero. Take them all down."

The statue of Jefferson Davis that has long resided at the University of Texas-Austin has now been removed after months of political correctness and liberal pressure.

The removal of the statue happened after students and other civil rights activists, carried forward by the momentum of taking down Confederate flags across the country, move forward with attempts to abolish all references to the Confederacy's side of the Civil War.

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With the statue's removal complete, it's unclear where political correctness advocates will next turn their attention.

Davis's statue, however, hasn't been completely removed from UT-Austin's campus. According to school administrators, the statue will soon be housed in a museum-like setting where it will be on display in the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History amid other historical artifacts and pieces.

Hopefully the activists don't frequent the display too often, otherwise the Briscoe Center may be targeted for removal.

While removing imagery that causes pain and grief--like the Confederate flag--or statues of leaders or men associated with similarly distressing situations--Davis, Robert E. Lee, and others--is becoming popular, it's hard to guess the effect of this political correctness on future generation's understanding of history.

Though liberals today are quick to decry any and all slave owners as evil, despicable people, the fact remains that the Founding Fathers lived and breathed and, yes, owned slaves in a different time period. That doesn't mean it was right or good for the slaves, but it shouldn't be the sole basis for excoriating these men.

It's a hard line between preserving history and choosing to wipe it out and pretend that people like Jefferson Davis never lived or that the Confederacy never attempted a breakaway from the Union. We need to tread this ground carefully as the future of our historical understanding depends upon it.

h/t: Cleburne Times-Review

 

 

 

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