Ramadan. Most Americans had never heard the word until the past few years and then, learning that it is a Muslim holy time of year, assumed – in the well-meaning way of a people who are accustomed to having a First Amendment guarantee to practice the religion of their choice, that the month-long period was akin to the way some Christians celebrate Christmas throughout December or possibly the nine-days of Chanukkah.

They are more than naïve – they could not be more wrong.

Ramadan is a month-long period of fasting required of all Muslims in commemoration of the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad, according to their belief.

The fasting consists of abstaining from eating, drinking, smoking, and intimate relations – but only during daylight hours – as well as behavior considered “sinful,” such as lying, gossiping, swearing.

A naïve Christian might see similarities to the practice of giving up chocolate for Lent, but there is a bonus for Muslims that comes with doing good acts during Ramadan – the spiritual rewards are multiplied.

ISIS, al Qaeda, and jihadists take this to heart and believe that acts against the infidel committed during the “holy” month guarantee double or even triple the rewards in the afterlife, and this year Ramadan is shaping up as particularly bloody.

This year, Ramadan lasts from June 6 to July 5, and IS spokesman Abu Mohammad al-Adnani called on Muslims to “make it a month of calamity everywhere for nonbelievers.”

The attack at Istanbul Ataturk Airport in Turkey by at least two suicide bombers killed 36 people and injured 147 is being described as a terror attack that fits the Ramadan profile.

The Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said the authorities believe ISIS is behind the attack, although the terror group did not immediately claim responsibility.

Bombings at a mosque in Damascus on June 11 and the attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando on the same night, support the need for renewed vigilance in the face of radical Islamic terrorism conducted as a part of their observance of the most holy time in their calendar.

Last year, hundreds died in terror attacks around the world at the hands of radical Islamic terrorists.

 

 

 

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