What is the likelihood that a presidential election could be rigged? Voting systems throughout America's history have had flaws and been manipulated, but the electronic systems that are currently in use are particularly vulnerable to a very inexpensive hack.

Security experts at Symantec, a widely-known and respected security firm, demonstrated on CBS's "This Morning" show how a $15 device could be used to throw an entire election. The device, which is widely available online, uses electronic means to reset voting cards that are issued to voters at the polls. With knowledge of the card and the system, a voter could reset their voting card and vote multiple times while inside the voting booth.

Though the likelihood of someone using the inexpensive device hinges upon a knowledge of the voting system that will be used on election day, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump brought up an interesting statistic from the 2012 election.

" I know last time, there were — you had precincts where there was practically nobody voting for the Republican. And I think that’s wrong. I think that was unfair, frankly."

What Trump is commenting on is not the possibility that there are precincts in the U.S. which vote entirely Democratic, but the fact that there are places where no Republican vote is cast. With as wide a political spread as this country contains, it's extremely unlikely that there would be a place which doesn't express some difference in opinion.

Trump may be a bit of a maverick when it comes to his belief in election fraud. Another Symantec expert said that it would be more likely that a voting system would be hacked from the outside than by the use of individual means.

But Trump's concern is valid. The American election system is a vital part of our freedom and heritage. We need that to remain sacrosanct from any influence, whether it be outside hackers or inside scammers.

h/t: 100 Percent Fed Up

 

 

 

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