Most people have never heard of Affinity Magazine, which is a blessing, as it virtually insures that millions while be spared from wasting time reading an insulting online article attacking law enforcement officers for the unpardonable “sin” of being… nice to African-Americans.

Affinity is a blog billed as a magazine about politics and social justice for teenagers founded by Evelyn Atieno, a black college student when she was 16-years-old.

Atieno writes that she created the blog to “talk about everything,” but in fact, the content leans heavily toward all things gender-related, such as non-binary and including asexuality white privilege and “white terrorism,” although a definition for that last item was difficult to find.

A recent headline proclaimed: You’re Not Pro-Black If You’re anti-LGBT.

So, it isn’t surprising Atieno would unquestioningly adopt the “Black Lives Matter” mantra and the attitude that goes with it in a blog post that begins with the hyperbolic and fact challenged statement, …the black community has been trying to come to grips with the constant black deaths happening almost daily at the hands of law enforcement.”

The blog post, “Dear Police Officers, Stop Exploiting Black Kids For Publicity Stunts,” takes aim at cops who take a pro-active approach to improving community relations between law enforcement and minorities.

How dare they?

Singling out photographs showing cops and kids interacting in positive ways – sharing a doughnut, for instance – the teen blog slams officers for taking “the easier solution” to the mistrust and fear each group feels for the other, “...instead of actually doing something about police brutality and discrimination against Black people.”

Ridiculing efforts by officers to reach out to African-Americans to build bridges, the blog calls such photographs “suspiciously well-framed” and even accuses the police of “invading the safe space of a black boy in order to further his own agenda” to use for publicity.

Last summer in Dallas, after officers were ambushed while serving in the line of duty protecting “Black Lives Matter” marchers, Police Chief David Brown challenged African-Americans to become a part of a real solution by joining the force, wearing the blue and the badge and making their communities safe.

The teens at Affinity Magazine would probably call that “selling out” or apply another disparaging term to the genuine outreach to begin the national conversation politicians insist we need.

Of course, Affinity doesn’t offer any other, better alternative. It’s far more fun to stick with the “cops are bad” narrative.

 

 

 

Send this to friend