Revisionist history can be dangerous – it rewrites events decades, centuries and even millennia old by placing them in the context of modern times to make them fit in with our values and view points.

While it can tidy up the unpleasant reality of the past, any time history is revised, edited or manipulated by governments of any kind, alarm bells should be sounded.

It was a practice perfected by the totalitarian regimes of Soviet bloc Europe that denied the people their own history with black outs and rewrites that deleted noble acts of resistance, even as Stalin cut generals and politicians entirely out of photographs if they offended him.

Renaming holidays in the United States has become the latest example of this kind of control of the historical narrative – a kind of politically correct move that will satisfy liberal progressives and leave others wondering how something that had been in place for hundreds of years can suddenly be “bad.”

With his signature, Bloomington, Indiana Mayor John Hamilton did away with the annual observance of two holidays long on the official calendar.

Henceforth, Hamilton declared, Columbus Day will be referred to as “Fall Holiday.”

Good Friday will be referred to as “Spring Holiday.”

The change is intended, according to the mayor, as a “another way to demonstrate our commitment to inclusivity.”

Bloomington, home to Indiana’s state university, and much like Boulder, Colorado, Madison, Wisconsin and Seattle, Washington, is an overwhelmingly liberal city that will probably cheer the change that in with that one sweep of the mayoral pen eradicates the arrival of Europeans on the North American continent and the reason schools have taken an “Easter Break” for generations.

The city is also the Monroe County seat that gave Democrat Hillary Clinton 58.6 of the vote in the November 2016 election.

Oddly, all Bloomington city employees have traditionally been paid for both holidays – Columbus Day, which is a federal and secular holiday, and Good Friday, a religious holiday.

Apparently, that reality was not a problem – only the names of the days-off were “bad” and needed to be changed.

 

 

 

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