Even with less than 90 days left in office, President Obama is staying true to his usual method of dealing with unpleasantries like verbatim quotes – he simply dismisses them expects dutiful reporters to tell Americans to do the same.

And for the past nearly eight years, that’s worked.

Keep your doctor? Keep your plan? It was a video? Not a smidgeon of evidence?

Americans – many of whom knew there wasn’t a smidgeon of truth in any of those statements – found it increasingly easier to accept Obama’s version of the truth as the years of his administration went by, are now being asked to swallow his interpretation of the phrase “quid pro quo” as “not quid pro quo.”

It is almost enough to make one miss the “it depends on what the meaning of ‘is’ is” days of the Bill Clinton presidency.

This time, Obama is challenging the notes of a two FBI officials detailing such an offer from a Clinton friend at the State Department to the FBI as “pure speculation.”

In other words, President Obama knows better than the FBI agents who were approached with offer and recorded the incident in the official report.

The “tit-for-tat” offer was made to FBI officials by Under Secretary of State for Management Patrick Kennedy as he pressured the bureau to change the security classification on a Hillary Clinton email during the yearlong investigation into her illegal email server set-up.

In exchange for the reclassification, Kennedy offered to provide the bureau with more “slots” in Iraq and other countries where the FBI cannot currently operate.

The notes specifically detail not only prolonged and repeated efforts to convince the FBI to downgrade the classified email to “unclassified,” but use the actual phrase “quid pro quo,” Latin for “this for that.”

That same unnamed official also accused Kennedy of making the offer to the bureau’s counterterrorism division head, Michael Steinbach.

He refused to make the change.

Significantly, the request came after Mrs. Clinton’s emails were subpoenaed by Congress.

The revelation comes in the last three weeks of the presidential campaign amid massive document dumps by Wikileaks and weekly releases by the FBI.

The damning documents, however, have been largely ignored by both the mainstream media and Clinton supporters, who are thought to be so solidly behind their candidate that they ignore any negative information about her.

Republican Congressional leaders have called for Kennedy’s removal pending an investigation, but hearings on the matter could only take place after the election on November 8.

FBI Director James Comey took the unusual step of requiring the agents in involved in the Clinton email investigation to sign a confidentiality agreement, but the FBI official who discussed the matter with the State Department is now retired.

 

 

 

 

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