A new report published by the Centre for Research on Globalization aims to uncover exactly how the United States government may have played a role in the creation of ISIS. Obviously the withdrawal of troops from Iraq and the Middle East left a power vacuum for ISIS to step in, but the report details how the United States was involved much earlier than that.

Global Research's article starts back in the early 70s and late 80s, when CIA agents worked closely with radical groups in the Middle East to gain intel, disrupt everyday life and achieve their objectives. Among the names listed is a familiar one that was privy to lots of U.S. help and support: Al Qaeda.

According to the report, Al Qaeda was "unquestionably a product of Western intelligence agencies," and "... [d]epending on whether a particular Al Qaeda terrorist group in a given region furthers American interests or not, the U.S. State Department either funds or aggressively targets that terrorist group."

That news should shake every American citizen to their core. The U.S. has been playing a dangerous game with rattlesnakes, feeding one and then starving it the next day. It's no wonder that terrorist groups have a death wish on America and the rest of Western civilization.

But the report delves further into the creation of ISIS, claiming that America helped in the creation of ISIS to "put pressure on Iran." The author of the article further goes on to say that ISIS grants America a 3-pronged assault with various objectives:

  1. America uses ISIS to "attack its enemies in the Middle East.
  2. ISIS serves a position as a "pretext for U.S. military intervention abroad."
  3. ISIS is used as bait to make Americans scared and worried so that the citizens will allow the government to implement radical monitoring and surveillance systems.

While the author's reasoning becomes somewhat far-fetched, his facts check out. Perhaps ISIS is an American creation, designed to serve the leaders in Washington. Either way, ISIS needs to be stopped and we need a batch of fresh faces in Washington.

h/t: Centre for Research on Globalization

 

 

 

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