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Within the last several years we’ve witnessed an alarming increase in violent police assaults, and in some cases specifically targeting police officers for no apparent reason other than for wearing the uniform.

This year alone there has been to date 132 total deaths of police officers killed nationwide in the “line of duty” with 59 killed by gunfire, an increase of almost 65% from last year, and we still have over a month left before the end of the year.

Which has prompted former New York City police detective and contributing Fox analyst Bo Dietl to suggest that cop killers should be put to death.

In the brief video clip Dietl doesn't mince any words he says: “If you kill a cop you should be put up for execution, this is a plague across our country.”

Dietl is also calling upon our President-elect Donald Trump, to enact legislation that would make killing a police officer a federal offense.

Which would require congressional approval, and perhaps a showdown with progressive legislators that all to often have turned their collective backs on that thin blue line of brave man and woman who stand as a buffer between anarchy and a civil society.

Moreover since President Obama has been in office America’s law enforcement professionals have been under increasing attacks by a progressive agenda that allows criminal illegal aliens to hide within sanctuary cities, creating mayhem upon our innocent citizens, while big city politicians remove the policing tools needed to combat street crime, such as “stop and frisk” that reduced crime within the big cities like New York and Chicago.

This in turn has emboldened criminals and those individuals on the radical political left to target police officers almost at well.

No doubt the epidemic of violence and the recent ambush assassination of police officers in New York, Iowa, San Antonio, Dallas, Baton Rouge and countless other cities and towns is in part the result of a federal justice system that is more concerned about political correctness then in the lives and well-being of our first respondents.

 

 

 

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