The facts surrounding alleged crimes committed by an Oklahoma City man against the Muslim community have taken a complicated turn, even as he has been charged with an obscure felony, “commission of a terrorist hoax.”

Although confessing to the crime, the defendant claims he was acting at the direction of a Muslim imam.

Justin William Bouma, 32, has been held in custody in the county jail since August 18 after he admitted to authorities that he sent a letter containing a suspicious white substance in a letter to the Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City intending that it be perceived to be the deadly bacteria, Anthrax.

In fact, the letter contained only the ingredients of cheap detergent that Bouma put in the letter’s envelope along with threats composed by letters cut from a magazine and a newspaper.

Similar mailings terrified Washington D.C. in the months following the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, and the crime is considered a serious threat to public safety due to the panic that can be unleashed by fears of Anthrax outbreaks.

Inhalation of the bacteria can be fatal.

Bouma attended the mosque in the past, and had sent threatening emails to some of its members leading police to question him about the terror hoax.

Bouma also was charged with a misdemeanor of malicious injury and destruction of property in connection with graffiti spray-painted on a Muslim grocery store next to the mosque.

In addition to several obscene statements and references to the Islamic terror group, ISIS, Bouma admitted to scrawling, “CAIR not welcome.”

CAIR is the acronym for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a radical group with ties to the Muslim Brotherhood.

According to the police affidavit, Bouma said the imam told him to spray-paint the store, but the suspect did not say why the Muslim clergy member would do so.

Recent incidents involving minorities falsifying “evidence” of harassment have heightened suspicions that members of certain groups deliberately create the impression that they are victims to gain publicity and sympathy.

 

 

 

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