The recently emerged story of a Muslim flight attendant who is suing the airline she worked for because they placed her on leave for refusing to serve alcohol is stirring up an interesting conversation in terms of religious liberties and workplace rights.

Charee Stanley is a flight attendant for ExpressJet airlines and has been working as an attendant for the past three years. One year into her tenure at ExpressJet Stanley converted to Islam, nothing new for a religion that has thousands of converts each year. Stanley didn't think that her new religion would get in the way of any of her work duties, until she found out this year that Islam prohibits both the consumption and the serving of alcohol.

For a while things seemed to go smoothly. Stanley says that the airline told her that she could work out an arrangement with other flight attendants to serve the alcohol that her passengers were ordering. But then one attendant got tired of doing more than her fair share of the duties and called foul. Stanley, called discrimination and filed a lawsuit against ExpressJet.

Stanley's lawyer says that the airline is required to give consideration to her religious beliefs as long as they don't cause any undue burden on the airline. Unfortunately for her, that's where her argument holds no water.

Obviously letting a Muslim flight attendant get the same pay as other attendants but do less work isn't fair. It means that her co-attendants have to pick up her extra duties that she is claiming she won't perform due to her religion.

Like it or not, this situation exactly mirrors the one faced by the Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis who said that her religious rights didn't allow her to give out marriage licenses. Davis wasn't doing a portion of her job and was jailed. Likewise, Stanley, the Muslim convert, can't expect to claim that she should remain employed while she refuses to perform a large part of her job duties.

h/t: CNN



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