In a rare moment of insight, Missouri Lieutenant Governor Peter Kinder revealed his opinion that United States Attorney General Eric Holder has not helped the situation in Ferguson, Missouri.

Kinder said that he wished that Holder had been more judicious in his comments after the shootings in Ferguson by Officer Darren Wilson.

Kinder also said that he was disappointed that Holder met with the family of Michael Brown but not with any family members or representatives of Officer Wilson or other law enforcement who stood behind him.

“Mr. Holder seemed to be putting his weight on one side of the scales of justice,” Kinder said, “and not backing up law enforcement.”

Kinder also said that Holder hadn’t met with him personally when he came to visit Ferguson and that Holder only met with one side of the issue.

It seems odd that the Attorney General, someone who holds such a public role in the Justice Department, would so brazenly show favoritism in a difficult issue.

While Holder may have felt that he was trying to avoid favoritism in the debate by avoiding contact what some in the country view as the offending party, how can someone who stands for justice propose to be an impartial judge—as justice should be—without consulting with both sides?

The question must come up whether Holder’s actions are the result of some sort of bias, whether it be racial or political, toward the issue.

Police brutality stories are cropping up all over the place in the media, and tempers are hot. However, how can an issue truly be solved without fair and impartial recognition of both sides’ stories? It can’t, and that’s part of the continuing problem in Ferguson.

If federal officials who were conducting their own “investigations” had worked to consult with both parties in the dispute, rather than stir up resentment and anger in the Ferguson mobs, maybe the situation would be winding down, rather than escalating.




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