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Global warming might just be on its last legs due to a new study that removes a central tenet of the climate change argument.

According to a paper by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, aerosols don’t cause the amount of cooling in the atmosphere that scientists since 1850 have factored into the climate.

Before this research, scientists thought that aerosols that combined in the atmosphere had a negative effect on the overall temperature of the earth because they reflected away some of the heat of the earth.

That argument meant that CO2 emissions were a strong player in the global climate, warming the earth as CO2 increased in the atmosphere at a higher rate than these aerosols led to cooling temperatures.

So when German scientists found that aerosols don’t actually reflect as much heat as they thought their argument puts CO2, the typical culprit in climate change discussions, in a bad place.

Here’s how the new argument puts climate change believers in a frenzy.

If aerosols don’t cool the earth as much as scientists thought, it means that they either don’t reflect heat from the sun, or do so on a small-scale. So more heat from the sun is penetrating the atmosphere and heating the earth’s surface.

That means that CO2 is no longer solely responsible for any heating that is taking place—and scientists are drastically lowering the amount that they think the earth has warmed.

Past studies have put forth numbers as high as 4.5 degrees Celsius in global warming, but this new argument lowers that threshold considerably to approximately 1.5 degrees Celsius.

That’s a huge difference.

In addition to disproving the argument that CO2 is responsible for all global warming this study pokes even more at the science behind many global warming arguments.

If scientists have been wrong for decades about a simple piece of the climate puzzle, how can we be sure that any of their arguments can hold water?

Other pieces of climate change “science” need to be put to the same rigor as this study. Hopefully in the future we’ll gain an accurate picture of the whole puzzle.

 

 

 

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