The United States has a fear complex regarding drones. While much of the rest of the world is embracing the technology, government and media are closing down discussion about safe and valuable uses for drone technology.

The recent actions of one drone pilot in Oklahoma aren't helping any of the pro-drone arguments, however.

In what appears to have been a failed attempt at smuggling contraband into the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, a mid-sized drone crashed inside the prison walls after being loaded with an eclectic mix of contraband intended for prison inmates.

Guards saw the drone as it struck some of the razor wire that lines the prison walls. The drone was apparently carrying a package of contraband secured with fishing line and lost control.

When guards recovered the drone and its package, they were amazed at the assortment of contraband inside. Included in the drone's payload were two hacksaw blades, several packages of cigarettes, a mobile phone and an extra battery, super glue, marijuana, and some meth.

Obviously the package was intended for an inmate, who would likely have used or traded the drugs and probably started planning an escape with the hacksaw blades.

This is the first time, reported prison officials, that someone outside of the prison attempted to smuggle in goods using a drone. Drones have been used in other states to varying degrees of effectiveness as smuggling tools.

In Ohio one drone dropped its package of illegal drugs in the yard where prisoners were relaxing. That prompted a fight among the inmates.

Though the police haven't been able to track down the perpetrator, this incident does showcase the importance of a recent FAA push to register all personal drones. Had the drone been properly registered, it could easily have been used to trace back to the owner.

Drones are a new technology. Unfortunately, people always seem to learn how to subvert technology to break the law. The problem here isn't with the drones. It's with the drone operators and the lack of drone restrictions.

h/t: Reuters



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