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It is no longer a matter of whether one supports or opposes Hillary Clinton in her final shot in her lifelong quest for the presidency – her truthfulness has been in shreds after FBI Director James Comey presented a 14-minute indictment enumerating the many instances Clinton violated federal law with her secret and unauthorized email server set-up while she served as President Obama’s first Secretary of State.

Clinton’s polling numbers have been shockingly low, with a recent NBC News/Survey Monkey showing that only 11 percent of American voters find the candidate “honest and trustworthy,” after decades in the public eye have laid bare her instinct to play fast and loose with both the truth and the law.

Whitewater, Travelgate, the so-called “Bimbo Eruptions” unit she convened to deal with her husband’s problems with sexual scandals all tarnished her reputation long before she was found to have lied to the American public about the terror attacks at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi on the anniversary of 9/11, the copacetic and cozy relationship between her family foundation and the State Department she headed and the revelations about her failure to protect classified material in her email communications.

Now, with the filing of a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission by the Campaign Legal Center (CLC), Clinton will face new questions about her seeming inability to merely follow the law instead of finding ways to go under, over or around it.

The complaint accuses the Clinton campaign of coordinating with David Brock’s Super PAC, Correct the Record (CTR), in violation of Federal Election Campaign Act regulations governing how contributions are spent – and by whom.

According to the allegations, CTR has spent $5.95 million in contributions in coordination with the Clinton campaign.

The super PAC was founded in 2015 to provide “rapid” digital responses to negative comments and stories about Clinton posted on social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The CLC says Brock’s super PAC acknowledged that sought to get around the law by an interpretation of the regulation that requires super PACs and the official campaign of candidates to operate independently as excluding blogs and other free content posted online.

CLC argues that CTR is not a group of dedicated volunteer bloggers, but a $6-million D.C.-based political arm of the Clinton campaign that conducts opposition research, video production, development of message content, training and booking of candidate surrogates and outreach to the media.

Should the allegations be found to be true, it would just be more proof that Clinton believes she can operate above and beyond the law.

 

 

 

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