One’s heart must go out to someone who has achieved fame and fortune by writing about oppression, poverty and racism in America, only to find himself unable to enjoy the fruits of his labor without offending his constituency of fellow victims.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, who became the darling of academia with his 2015 book, “Between the World and Me,” about racial injustice in America, has been forced to cancel a move to the affluent Prospect-Lefferts neighborhood in Brooklyn after unfavorable reaction and criticism in the media and “Twitterverse.”

The success of the book provided Coates, who is black, with the fortune to buy the $2.1 million home, which was purchased under the name of a limited-liability corporation (LLC) he and his wife formed to allow the couple to hide their identity in public records.

Coates is a guest columnist for the New York Times, and national correspondent for The Atlantic, writing on such topics as, “The Fear of a Black President” and “The Case for Reparations.”

The New York Times covered the news about the cancelled move, but did not mention of the criticism Coates has received for wanting to move to the gentrified area.

While content to make millions savagely criticizing America as oppressing blacks, Coates has been forced to forego the American dream of buying his dream house because his fellow victims resent it and the mere fact of his success belies his thesis that the deck remains stacked against blacks.

Casting himself as a victim, Coates wrote, “You can’t really be a human being and not want some place to retreat into yourself, some place to collapse, some place to be at peace,” claiming that he was concerned about “the perpetual stream of fans showing up at the door or waiting for you on your stoop.”

One astute person tweeted: “T. Coates pimped them white liberals all the way to a $2.1 million crib in Brooklyn,” while another referenced increasing demands of liberals for so-called “safe spaces” on university campuses, tweeting, Just read about the harrowing story of the violation of Ta-Nehisi Coates' $2 million safe space.”

 

 

 

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