America enjoys its morning coffee without giving much thought to where the beans came from or the government policies our coffee money supports around the world.

The Indonesian province of Aceh is the 7th largest exporter of coffee to the U.S., taking in $326.5 billion annually, and is also the first in the world to impose harsh Sharia law on non-Muslims, despite promises of its government assuring concerned human rights groups that freedom of religion would be respected

Unfortunately, the public beating of a 60-year-old Christian woman who was whipped with 30 strokes of rattan canes, the first time a Sharia-based punishment was carried out against a non-Muslim, proves the promise of religious tolerance was a lie.

The woman’s crime? Selling alcohol.

As is usually the case, the sentence was carried out in public, as humiliation and shaming are a key component of Sharia punishments, in addition to acting as a deterrent to discourage others from committing crimes against Islam lest they suffer the same – or more severe – sentences.

In fact, whether the sentence is caning, which causes intense pain, broken skin, and bleeding, or execution, the public event draws crowds who are encouraged to mock and insult the convicted “criminal,” as many record the grisly scene on cameraphones to be shared and posted on social media sites.

Americans might be shocked to know that similar punishment is doled out for such crimes as gambling, public displays of affection, or, in the case of women, straddling a motorcycle, and though liberals are quick to boycott states that enact “bathroom” laws, there is little movement to give up their morning cup of coffee to register disgust with brutality dispensed in the name of Islam.




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